Inventor API: Custom add-in #2 – Functionality and UI

Hello!
Writing our add-in for Inventor continues! Agenda for today’s post is simple: first I will write a word or two about what is the functionality of the add-in, then I will present the UI and what settings it provides, finally I will present the code.

FUNCTIONALITY

So, what will the add-in do? It allows user to place initial break to the biggest view in the drawing. It is rarely required in real world but the purpose of this demonstration is not to write something widely useful but to present how to write basic add-in for Inventor. Nevertheless, I wouldn’t be surprised if someone finds actual use for it. Feel free to do that 🙂
Inventor allows to set some parameters of the break. First and the most important is orientation. In our case that will be determined not by the user but automatically depending on proportions of the view. The rest will be allowed for customisation. As this is not an Inventor tutorial I am not going to describe in details how to manually add the break and what exactly can be customised. For such pieces of information you can easily find something on YouTube (for example this[1]).

UI PRESENTATION

As our add-in is very simple its UI is equally simple. Combo box for break style, slider for number of symbols (for structural style), text box gap which value will be converted to double and is expressed in centimetres, and slider ratio of how much of the view will be removed (minimum is 10%, maximum is 90%, however if the view is to small the break will not be applied). This small dialog is built in WPF and follows the MVVM pattern.

CODE

As this add-in will use WPF user interface I want it to follow the MVVM pattern, therefore we need model and view-model.

Model
So, let’s start with the model as this one is the simplest:

Style parameter is represented by an integer property backed by a field. The property setter allows only two values: 0 and 1 – that’s how two possible options are represented. Other possibility could be for instance a boolean, however integer is simpler to use with combo box. Similar situation with Symbols where setter allows only 1, 2, or 3 to be assigned; and with Range which can vary from 10 to 90. Gap is auto-property of type double. Class constructor sets initial values which are hard-coded. Natural extension would be to save those values somewhere so they are saved between sessions, however it’n not the point at the minute. The model class SettingsModel is additionally abstracted by ISettingsModel interface.

View-model
The view-model is slightly more complicated, but still quite simple.

First and foremost – it implements INotifyPropertyChanged interface. Fields and properties reflect the model, there are two things that require explanation. Range field/property backing field is of type double which is consistent with its counterpart in the model, while property is of type int which is consistent with slider’s value property. Gap field/property is of type string which will be bound to a textbox. The view-model also contains reference to model which is set via default constructor, constructor also assigns values from the model to respective fields in view-model. There is only one method which is used to save values from view-model to model; and there is only one command which invokes SaveToModel() method and closes settings dialog.

As mentioned SaveCommand is used to save values from view-model to model. It can be executed only when Gap value in view-model can be parsed to doubleExecute(object parameter) method casts parameter to type Window and invokes its Close() method to close the window. This require passing open instance of settings window to command parameter, which will be explained below.

View
Now, the view. There is one trick with WPF windows in Inventor add-in. If you try to add a WPF component to the project you will see that only user control is available, but the problem is that we need a window. A way to tackle that (source[2]) is to add what we can – a user control, and then change it to window. You need to do that in XAML code of the window and in the C# code behind. In XAML change root node to <Window>…</Window>, in C# code modify your class so it inherits from Window not from UserControl. And that’s it.

The only intresting thing in the XAML code above is how current instance of window is passed as command parameter:

The command parameter value is set to binding with RelativeSource set again to RelativeSource in FindAncestor mode with type of Window. This way  the current instance of window will be passed as command parameter which in turn is closed by the command.
Other than that, there are not exceptional things in the XAML, simply built UI with typical binding to view-model.
What you probably noticed, is that data-context is not set, and instance of view-model is not created in XAML, which requires the view-model to have parameter-less constructor, therefore some changes to add-inn StandardAddInServer main class are required.
Another thing worth mentioning is that closing (without saving settings to model) by clicking ‘Cancel’ button is achieved simply by an event assigned to that button, not by a command. This way to do that is much, much simpler than a command and because of the fact that it doesn’t interact with neither model nor view-model it doesn’t break the MVVM pattern.

Updates in StandardAddInServer
First thing that we need to do is to instantiate a model. The main class will be equipped in private field of type ISettingsModel […]

[…] which will be initialised in the class’ constructor.

The last thing we need to do is open the settings window when appropriate button is clicked. To do that we need a method that will be fired when the button is clicked.

The method above creates new settings window, sets it data-context to new instance of SettingsViewModel with current model as constructor’s parameter and finally shows the window as dialog.

And that’s it. Next (and the last) step will be to make ‘Apply!’ button to work. So, don’t forget to check my blog a little bit later.
Thanks, Michal!

GitHub repo: https://github.com/mickaj/AutoBreaker-Inventor

Sources:
[1] – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BzUAb9Qvu98
[2] – http://adndevblog.typepad.com/manufacturing/2015/11/wpf-window-inside-an-inventor-add-in.html

Inventor API – Custom add-in Part #1
Inventor API – Custom add-in Part #3